It’s random day!

Some miscellaneous stuff to share today. Here’s what’s on my mind:

EPIC FAILURES OF THE WEEK

1. I tried to invent my own super-duper-totally-amazing-mind-blowing veggie shake. I had grand plans for it. It would taste fabulous. It would be insanely healthy. I would drink it all day long.

My experiment:

To be honest it doesn’t taste THAT bad. But who’s going to believe that?

2. My plyo workout on Monday was insane. I was doing freakishly hard and very strange upper body pushups. Kind of like jumping with my arms at different height levels and catching myself and doing pushups all at once. I scrapped both my knees.

How does one scrape their knees while doing pushups? I can now teach you.

Also – I hate medicine balls. Medicine balls get thrown at my head and they make my abs cry. They also gave me a thumb bruise.

THINGS I CAN’T STOP THINKING ABOUT

1. Childhood obesity.

I touched on being overweight yesterday, but not in relation to children. I mentioned how we are all born with a certain number of fat cells, but if we are overweight as children and adolescents, that number increases. However, as adults this number stays the same. Our fat cells only get bigger with added weight.

The fact that the body of a growing, overweight child will actually develop more fat cells is enormous. I don’t know why people don’t point this out more often. This is exactly why childhood obesity is such a big deal. Those extra fat cells will stay with that child forever. And it is these cells that will ultimately contribute to lifelong weight issues, and potentially life threatening illnesses.

Children eat what you feed them. If you are raising an overweight child, you are essentially giving them a life sentence of long term health problems. Personally, I don’t see how this is different than any other form of child abuse. It may even be worse.

When I was kid, I got hit all the time. Bruises heal and swelling goes down. But when a parent changes the physiological structure of their child’s body, that is just unimaginably wrong.

I know a lot of people who think it’s cute or harmless to keep their kids fat. The argument is that “they’re growing; they’ll grow out of it.” But that’s the point. They ARE growing. It’s actually much healthier for someone to gain weight as an adult, than to gain weight as a child. Those extra fat cells are not going to disappear. It’s a big deal.

It really bothers me to watch parents feed continuous crap to their kids. There are some diseases (like diabetes) that children should never suffer. So if you’re incapable of feeding your children well, don’t have any.

2. Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution.

If you’re not watching this series, you should immediately start. Sign his petition too. Jamie is on a mission to clean up the horrendous nutrition situation in the public school system. I still can’t get over one of the earlier episodes when he brought a tomato into an elementary class and NOBODY KNEW WHAT IT WAS.

Another big moment for me: an obese high school student was told she only had seven years to live because of spots on her liver due to a lifelong diet of unhealthy, professed foods. She might not make it past her 20s.

It’s hard for me to feel sympathy for parents that do this to their kids.

3. Our bones.

There are two groups of cells in our body that affect our bones: Osteoclasts and Osteoblasts. It’s mind blowing to me how these cells work.

When we envision bones, we think of very hard, unchanging structures. The dry stuff from corpses. But that’s just what’s left after all the living components have been stripped away.

Our bones are alive.

Bones are where all our minerals are stored. They are also where new blood cells are created. And the most interesting part – our bones will continuously break themselves down and reconstruct themselves. Some people lose as much as 1/3 of their skeletal structure by age 75 (and rebuild it again)!

Osteoclasts are cells that break down our bones. They do this in order to release the minerals we have stored there. When we run, we require calcium to contract the muscles in our legs. We get this calcium by breaking down our own bones. While this is happening, another set of cells (the osteoblasts), go around repairing that bone. So we can actually take bone from one area of our bodies and MOVE it to another area where there is more need.

I always thought we were born with one set of bones and that’s pretty much it. But we’re constantly regenerating. If our diet is low in minerals, there is more bone breakdown because the osteoclasts are looking for those nutrients. If mineral deficiencies persist, our bones will become brittle. Also as we age, the osteoblasts become less active, which is why older people have weaker bones.

Can you imagine watching this process under a microscope? This was the best video about it that I could find.

I can’t understand WHY this is not all over the news as the coolest thing EVER?! Regenerating bone! Do you know who ELSE does that? Superheroes.