2013: Stats From a Year of Travel Blogging

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 310,000 times in 2013. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 13 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

redwoods national park

Being silly in beautiful places = what we did in 2013. Same plan for 2014.

Happy new year, dear readers!

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Check out my book: The Summit Seeker

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2013: A Year of Travel Across North America

2013 vanessaruns
“Life is full of beauty. Notice it. Notice the bumble bee, the small child, and the smiling faces. Smell the rain, and feel the wind. Live your life to the fullest potential, and fight for your dreams.” – Ashley Smith

What could you do in one year if nothing were holding you back?

This is the question I asked myself at the beginning of 2013. My quest to answer it has taken us 40,000 miles across the continent. We began in California and drove north to Alaska. In the fall, we drove across Canada, then dropped into Pennsylvania for the winter at The Wolfestead. We have explored 2,000+ miles of trails and there is an urgency I feel when I tell people to stop putting off their ambitions. There is nothing holding us back.

2013: A VIDEO YEAR IN REVIEW

Direct YouTube Link HERE

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Check out my book: The Summit Seeker

East Jesus in Slab City: Finding Community in the Desert

East Jesus

“The only way to find out about East Jesus is if someone else tells you about it. We want to keep it that way.”

- Frank, East Jesus resident cook

National Geographic was turned down the opportunity to document the commune that thrives at East Jesus. So have countless  other media. These guests and residents live simply, humbly, and off the grid. They snub publicity and large media corporations.

When we drove up to the gates of East Jesus, Frank came out to greet us.

“How did you find out about East Jesus?” he demanded.
“Mike told us.” Shacky replied. Mike has lived in Slab City for more than 20 years, and installed our solar panels for less than half the price we were quoted at any other solar company. He did an amazing job with high-quality panels.
“Mike’s a good guy,” Frank smiled, and welcomed us in immediately. He gave us a full tour and invited us to stay for a couple of days.

East Jesus was first described to me as a remote spot in the desert where artists gather to create beautiful things out of the garbage that they find lying around Slab City. “People come (to Slab City)  and see that there’s garbage everywhere. What they don’t realize is that it’s not our garbage–it was already here. We’re just trying to create something beautiful with it.”

All of the artwork at East Jesus can be touched, sat on, climbed into, and fully experienced. They have a Mercedes that has been set on fire. A towering elephant made out of discarded rubber. A “babies in barbed wire” display. They have a VW bus that has been intricately decorated and has visited Burning Man twice. And these are only small examples of the fascinating creations at East Jesus.

After the art tour, Frank took us behind the PRIVATE PROPERTY signs into the gathering places of their commune. We explored their kitchen, outdoor living room, functioning bathroom, power room, library, and music room. They provide wifi and three meals a day. They have a BBQ, a smoker, and a fire pit.

“The first 48 hours here are free,” Frank explains. “We know what it’s like to be a traveler. Sometimes you just need a place to stand still for a couple of days.” East Jesus will take you in, feed you, and give you a safe place to sleep.

“After that, we require one hour of work per day, five days a week, ” Frank explains. For “work” you can do anything you want. You can work in the kitchen, you can clean, or “if you want to blow shit up, we have shit to blow up.” The concept of “work” is to do something you enjoy and are good at.

This little commune is established on the belief that people, if left alone with no rules to restrict them, can and will live up to their full potential. I am reminded of my own years of office work and its limitations on my creativity, ideas, and passions.

For $150 per month here, you can live in their community. The “rent” includes free wifi, all meals, working bathrooms, a music room, a library, and the freedom to use any of their resources to create art.

As Pat Sweeney said after our tour, “It makes me happy that this place exists.”

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Ultrarunning Through 2012: My Year in Point Form & Video

Today I was going through my old photos and I was really taken by how filled this year has been with so many firsts, and so many amazing adventures. Here is my year in point form, and in photos.

January

* Started the year with a new distance PR at Across the Years: 100K
* Completed the Disney Goofy Challenge in January (half marathon followed by marathon the next day)

February

* Ran my first 100-miler at Rocky Road 100
* Completed my first mud run (Spartan Race)
* New marathon PR at Surf City

March

* First DFL at Rodeo Valley 50K (four-way DNF with friends–the best kind!)

April

* Beat Shacky for the first time at Oriflamme 50K
* First of many Mount Baldy summits

May

* Grand Canyon R2R2R
* First of many shared miles with ultra legend Gordy Ainsleigh
* DNF at PCT 50 (Grand Canyon legs)
* Slowest 50K ever at Born to Run 50K (failed barefoot attempt)
* Second 100-mile attempt at Nanny Goat 100 (dropped at 55 miles)
* Quit my job to focus on running and writing

June

* First pacing gig at San Diego 100
* Met Scott Jurek and got my Kindle autographed
* Shopping for a Rialta RV
* Got my dreads :)

July

* Training runs with Gordy Ainsleigh on his stomping grounds & Western States course

August

* Bought the RV!
* Transrockies 6-day Challenge (120 miles)

September

* Course PR at Noble Canyon 50K
* Volunteered at inaugural Mogollon Monster 100

October

* Completed inaugural Cuyamaca 100K
* Visited and ran in Zion National Park
* Summited Arizona’s highest peak, Mt. Humphrey’s
* Finished my second 100-miler at Javelina 100

November

* Ate my way through the Krispy Kreme Challenge (Lite Division)
* Ran the last few days with Rae on her Run Across American
* Completed my third 100-miler at Chimera 100, my first mountain 100
* First Zion 100 training run
* Ran with Colby on his first marathon

December

* Cheered friends at their first ultra at Ridgecrest 50K
* Multi-day Noble Challenge (5 summits in 5 days, 100 miles)
* Next up: Across the Years 72-Hour

Transitions

* From barefoot running to minimalist running (and sometimes Hokas!)
* From some roads to all trails
* From flats to mountains

* From 50Ks to 100 milers (still haven’t run a 50 miler!)
* From racing everything to racing some, and volunteering more

Highlights I’m most proud of:

* From zero 100-milers, to three in one year (should be four at Across the Years!)
* Finished my first book, to be released in 2013 titled The Summit Seeker: Memoirs of a Trail Running Nomad
* Ditching the daily grind and moving into the RV to explore, write, and run

May your 2013 be filled with joy and adventure. Happy Holidays!

Ultrarunning Through 2012 Video

Direct YouTube Link HERE

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